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Review - DC Rebirth: Wonder Woman #1

Review - DC Rebirth: Wonder Woman #1

*SPOILERS*

I apologize in advance; I have hardly touched any Wonder Woman comics and my knowledge of the character is slim, but I'm learning as much as I can as quickly as possible. I've been wanting to pick up a Wonder Woman comic for a long time now and saw the DC Universe Rebirth as a perfect opportunity to jump on the train. 

This first issue really seems like more of a teaser than a full-on reintroduction to the character. What is presented here is engaging and had me very curious about what's to come, though I do wish this book were a bit on the meatier side. 

The book starts off with Wonder Woman searching for something or someone in the Banakane rain forest and that her being there is the only choice she had. Her purpose in the rain forest is kept vague, creating an intriguing mystery. I immediately noticed that the pencil-work by Liam Sharp is amazingly detailed and the coloring by Laura Martin brings the lush jungle to vibrant life. There's a great attention to detail here and much love was put into the design of Wonder Woman herself. I was also surprised to see that they more-or-less borrowed the skirt design from her movie version. 

The story cuts to now-Commander Etta Candy as she meets up with a group of officials at what looks to be a command center of some sort. They are on the hunt for Cadula and his men who have caused turmoil in the region. They also mention that they've spotted Wonder Woman in the Banakane area. Steve Trevor is also revealed to still be working with Candy and is on the front lines searching for Cadula. Candy has her suspicions that Trevor must have called Wonder Woman in. So far I like the dynamic they've set up here as I'm curious to figure out how all of these characters end up coming together and under what circumstances.

Wonder Woman continues her trek through the progressively darker and more hostile rain forest. The sense of intrigue and foreboding builds as she approaches a large pile of bones and a sinister-looking tribal figure. This really got me interested in what she could possibly be seeking in the middle of the outlandish rain forest. What could these people possibly provide her with? 

The book concludes with her facing off against a horde of werewolf-looking creatures. Their design is well-conceived and the promise of a fight is exciting. Of course, they attack, and of course Wonder Woman emerges victorious. What I definitely didn't expect was for Wonder Woman to get caught off guard by none other than Cheetah. It is then revealed that Wonder Woman has lost her way to Themyscira and that she desperately needs Cheetah's help. This obviously opens up even more questions. 

Yes, this book has me hooked, but there wasn't enough in-between to build up to that cliff-hanger. I wanted a bit more information about the rain forest, it's people and the creatures that dwell there. Maybe this is something that fans of Wonder Woman already know about and it would seem like a re-hash, but from an outside perspective, I wanted a little more. Still, this comic doesn't disappoint, it just feels like half of a great intro.

To sum up, the writing here is good, Greg Rucka tells a lot in just a few words, making natural allusions to what is happening elsewhere without it sounding like blatant exposition. The art work is probably the highlight for me here, you don't see too many comics with this much detail on display and it's just a delight to see Wonder Woman brought to life so vividly. I'll definitely be checking out issue #2 and will hopefully have a review up for it shortly.

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